Sorghum: The Ancient Grain That’s Got It All

recipes

When you hear the word sorghum you might think animal feed, that’s what I thought until I discovered how tasty and amazing this ancient grain is for us too. It’s the fifth most important cereal crop in the world, mainly because of its natural drought tolerance and versatility as food, feed and fuel. One of the reasons it’s gaining popularity now is because it’s naturally gluten free. It’s also grown from traditional hybrid seeds.

Sorghum can be substituted for wheat flour in a variety of baked goods. Its neutral, sometimes sweet, flavor and light color make it easily adaptable to a variety of dishes. Sorghum improves the texture of recipes and digests more slowly with a lower glycemic index, so it sticks with you a bit longer than some other flours or flour substitutes. One of my favorite ways to make it is this tasty tabbouli like salad developed by my friend and colleague dietitian Regina Ragone.

Sorghum Super Salad

1 cup/192 grams sorghum 

1 red pepper about 6.75 oz/193 grams, chopped

1 yellow pepper about 6.75 oz/193 grams, chopped

3 scallions, chopped

1/4/ teaspoon/1.5 grams kosher salt

2 tablespoons/ 30 ml/27grams olive oil

2 tablespoons/30 ml/32 grams balsamic vinegar

1 teaspoon/ 5 ml/5 grams mustard

1 teaspoon/ 5 ml/7g honey

3.5 oz/99 grams reduced-fat feta

  1. Prepare sorghum according to packing directions making sure to add 1/4 teaspoon salt to water. Remove to bowl to cool.
  2. Add peppers and scallions to sorghum. 
  3. Combine vinegar, mustard and honey. Whisk in olive oil. Add salt to taste. 
  4. Pour over sorghum mixture and toss to coat. Stir in feta.

Makes 5 cups. You can easily use 1/2 the amount of all ingredients and cut the recipe to 2.5 cups. Serve about 1/4 cup for a bariatric portion.

Subscribe to our newsletter so you never miss a single podcast episode.

Plus get our latest content by email.

We hate SPAM. We will never sell your information, for any reason.